Opportunities in Educators Rising

State+officers+at+the+UNO+Expo.+%28Left+to+right%29+Jenna+Hamilton%2C+Hope+Belcastro%2C+Christina+Fischer%2C+Evelyn+Leones

State officers at the UNO Expo. (Left to right) Jenna Hamilton, Hope Belcastro, Christina Fischer, Evelyn Leones

Do you plan to work with kids or being a teacher in the future? If so, Omaha South High offers Educators Rising to any students. This year their goal as a program strives to volunteer more around the community and promote more school spirit at South.

Educators Rising is a nationwide organization that helps any student that would want to pursue any career that requires being around children. The advisors at South are Sam Bojanski and Samantha Koehler. They will assist their students to find events and connections that will help you succeed in the future.

Evelyn Leones, senior at South High, began attending Educators Rising meetings in her first year. She was not really involved up until her sophomore year. She currently holds the role as State Vice President of Communications. As State Vice President of Communications, she is required to take care of their social media page and post stuff that is up to date. For her to get this role, she had to submit a video answering questions, give a speech to the advisor and submit a typical application.

“Covid hit us pretty hard so we would like to expand since our numbers got very low,” said Leones.

They plan to bring back one of their most popular events this year. Nightmare on L St was a big hit year of 2019 right before covid struck.

At this event in the past, Educators Rising passed out candies to their community, had a haunted house for people to attend, and there were many clubs and organizations that showed up. This gave everyone that visited an opportunity to see what is in our South Omaha community.

Leones feels that her social and communication skills have improved since she began to attend Educators Rising. Leones gets put into many situations where she is forced to speak to unknown crowds which pushes her to become better. It encourages students to get involved and do the same.

“It’s okay to be uncomfortable,” Leones said.